Banknotes and Coins Glossary

Banknotes and Coins Glossary

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Scanning 

Sequential tracking of every point of an image to be reproduced or processed. A light reader scans the image point-by-point and line-by-line. The reflection of each point of the image is detected by a photoelectric cell and the average value is stored in the memory of a computer, to later compose an image.

Security paper 
The type of paper used for manufacturing valuable documents. It is the support medium used for printing banknotes and for certain security measures. Furthermore, it is in itself a security feature because it contains watermarks and a filament or thread. Commercial papers are mainly supplied with optical whiteners which render them fluorescent, while security paper is not fluorescent.
Security thread 
"A security feature frequently used in banknotes. The thread is sometimes intertwined in the structure of the fibres of the paper (embedded), and sometimes it comes to the surface of the paper at intervals ("window" thread). Security thread can be made of metal or plastic, transparent or opaque, coloured or colourless. If the security thread is completely embedded in the structure of the paper, it is invisible in reflected light but visible when held against the light. In many cases security threads are supplied with printed micro-text. Other variations of security threads are fluorescent printing, holograms, etc. On euro banknotes, the thread is embedded into the paper and has micro-printing."
See-through register 
This is a security feature partially printed on the obverse of the banknote and partially on its reverse. When held against the light, both parts should combine to show the full image. The see-through register makes counterfeiting difficult as it is very complicated to reproduce exactly the two images that make up the motif.
Sensors 
Devices able to detect specific security features on banknotes.
Series (first, second, etc.) 

A unitary series of banknotes of different denominations that form a monetary system. The first series of euro banknotes, issued on 1 January 2002, contains seven denominations (€5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200 and €500).

Silkscreen printing 
A printing process in which the ink is applied onto the paper through a metal or fibre mesh. The ink passes onto the paper through the areas not blocked by the mesh. Optically variable ink (OVI) is applied to banknotes using this technique.
Specimen 
"A legitimate banknote marked, by printing or a perforation system, with the word ""specimen"" to make it a banknote of reference for consultation, study and analysis. In Spanish, the word espécimen is used."
Stars of the European Union 
These form part of the European Union symbol that appears on euro banknotes. The twelve stars of the symbol allude to the dynamism and harmony of modern-day Europe.
Substrate 
This is the material on which an image is printed, such as paper, plastic, etc. In the majority of cases, banknotes are printed on paper. For euro banknotes the substrate, printing medium, is paper.